Under the Large Aircraft Security Program, the US Government will have to search your plane before every flight. The TSA will know how often you fly, where you fly, and who goes with you. And yes you have to pay for it. $50 a flight.

Lieberman to hold aviation security hearing — Get MOTIVATED!

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By Keith Laing – 10/27/11 04:08 PM ET

 

A Senate committee will look at the state of aviation security 10 years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the office of Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Joe Lieberman announced Thursday.

The committee will hold a hearing Nov. 2 titled “Ten Years After 9/11:The Next Wave in Aviation.” The meeting will be chaired by Lieberman (I-Conn.) and ranking Republican on the Homeland Security panel Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine).

The hearing comes as the Transportation Security Administration, which was created after the 9/11 attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. is under fire for a sexual note left in a passenger’s bag. The agency has been criticized broadly for its airport security practices, including pat-down hand searches and body scans.

 Lieberman’s office said Thursday the hearing would “examine the development of new technologies used in screening airline passengers, detecting suspicious cargo, and uncovering potential terrorist threats.”

 “This is the last in a series of hearings the Committee has held to examine the country’s improved preparedness since 9/11 and what vulnerabilities still remain,” Lieberman’s office said in the announcement.

The hearing will take place next Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Source:
http://thehill.com/blogs/transportation-report/aviation/190299-sen-liebermann-to-hold-aviation-security-hearing
 
 
CALL YOUR SENATOR, NOW!  And tell him how you feel about the TSA and their encroachment on your Constitutional rights.  The meeting is the second of November, do it today; have them come to work on Monday to a full voice mail box.  Get the word out!
Posted: October 28th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized

You can feel the love…

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TSA Plans to Produce Revamped Security Proposal by Year-end

October 24, 2011

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officials have told NBAA that they hope to issue a new proposed business aircraft security program by the end of this year. The new proposal, which is expected to be markedly different from the Large Aircraft Security Program (LASP) offered several years ago, will need to be reviewed and approved by the Department of Homeland Security and Office of Management and Budget before being published for public comment.

“TSA heard our concerns about the most egregious elements of the original LASP proposal,” said Doug Carr, NBAA’s vice president for safety, security & regulation. Those provisions included the aircraft weight threshold, prohibited items list, and the requirements for third-party auditors and armed security guards onboard business airplanes. Even the name of the new security proposal is expected to be different, no longer including the word “large,” which was a misnomer anyway.

TSA has included a “trusted pilot” element in all of its other security programs, and Carr expects it to be part of the new proposal as well. Carr also believes that the new proposal will reflect more of a risk-based approach to security, since TSA Administrator John Pistole, in an effort to evolve his agency into a high-performance counterterrorism organization, has announced plans to reorganize TSA so it can adopt a more intelligence-driven, risk-based approach to security.

Besides having received input from NBAA Staff, business aircraft operators (including NBAA’s Security Council) have helped TSA officials re-craft the business aviation security proposal, said Doug Hofsass, TSA’s deputy assistant administrator for Transportation Sector Network Management, during a well-attended security session at the recent NBAA Annual Meeting & Convention. “This rule is going to make a lot more sense, and it’s really good security,” he declared.

Wow, maybe the NBAA and the TSA should get a room, what with all the mutual admiration?

This is a bad idea, period.  No matter what it’s called.  The DHS and TSA’s own studies have already covered the limited utility of GA in any terrorist threat.  There are already programs to cover Part 135.  There is no need for this.

But, it’s a great segway into the rest of aviation. 

Oh no, the TSA would never do that… then you better read that article on the “road warriors” in Tennessee again.  I’m telling you the alphabet soup is selling us out, compromise and declare victory will not get you the freedom to fly your airplane like you do now.  If you want that to continue, you better join the fight.

Posted: October 24th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized

BIG BROTHER IS HERE, RIGHT NOW, TODAY!

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I want everybody to run, don’t walk, to the library and check out a copy of “1984” by George Orwell.  We are here, folks.  It’s happening, and one day you’ll wake up and wonder what the hell hit you when you can’t even leave your house without permission.

From Channel 5 in Nashville, TN

By Adam Ghassemi

PORTLAND, Tenn. – You’re probably used to seeing TSA’s signature blue uniforms at the airport, but now agents are hitting the interstates to fight terrorism with Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR).

“Where is a terrorist more apt to be found? Not these days on an airplane more likely on the interstate,” said Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security Commissioner Bill Gibbons.

Tuesday Tennessee was first to deploy VIPR simultaneously at five weigh stations and two bus stations across the state.

Agents are recruiting truck drivers, like Rudy Gonzales, into the First Observer Highway Security Program to say something if they see something.

“Not only truck drivers, but cars, everybody should be aware of what’s going on, on the road,” said Gonzales.

It’s all meant to urge every driver to call authorities if they see something suspicious.

“Somebody sees something somewhere and we want them to be responsible citizens, report that and let us work it through our processes to abate the concern that they had when they saw something suspicious,” said Paul Armes, TSA Federal Security Director for Nashville International Airport.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol checked trucks at the weigh station with drug and bomb sniffing dogs during random inspections.

“The bottom line is this: if you see something suspicious say something about it,” Gibbons said Tuesday.

The random inspections really aren’t any more thorough than normal, according to Tennessee Highway Patrol Colonel Tracy Trott who says paying attention to details can make a difference. Trott pointed out it was an Oklahoma state trooper who stopped Timothy McVeigh for not having a license plate after the Oklahoma City bombing in the early 1990s.

Tuesday’s statewide “VIPR” operation isn’t in response to any particular threat, according to officials. (Bold and Italics from StopLASP.com)

Armes said intelligence indicates law enforcement should focus on the highways as well as the airports.

No threat, just going to start looking.  See, we’re the good guys, we just want you to be a responsible citizen and give us a call if you see something ‘suspicious’… 

And when you get a dime dropped on you because you cut somebody off in traffic?

And when your kids drop a dime because you make them be home by a certain time?

Or your neighbor’s dog is barking all night and you think that’s suspicious?

Once again, here at StopLASP we’re not against security nor safety.  But we are for Constitutional freedoms, like the 4th Amendment.  You don’t have to like what I do, but if it’s not illegal, I have a right to do it.

That includes flying airplanes.  If you see your hangar neighbor putting 55 gallon drums in his aircraft and filling them with avgas — there’s no STC for that and you should maybe ask a question or two and maybe make a phone call.  But if you fly out of an airport where the jump plane thinks he owns the pattern, being impolite isn’t against FARs either.

It’s a slippery slope and we are very, very close to it.  The world your children will grow up in could be extremely different if you don’t get involved.

Posted: October 24th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized

New LASP Proposal Expected Soon

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When the Transportation Security Administration proposed its Large Aircraft Security Program in 2008, the response from the aviation community was fast and furious, and now a revised version is expected to be proposed soon. The new LASP should be out in the next few months, EAA said on Monday, and a new public comment period will be designated. The original proposal attracted more than 8,000 comments, most of them “overwhelmingly negative,” according to EAA. The new version is expected to have a higher minimum weight than the original 12,500 pounds, and will provide more flexibility to aircraft operators.

The agency spent two years redesigning the program after ditching the original proposal in 2009, EAA said. Industry representatives were consulted for input on the second version. Opponents to the original plan created a website called StopLASP to encourage pilots and others to write their representatives in Washington in protest.

 

 

Thanks to Paul and the guys at AvWeb for the mention.  We are not just opposed to the first one, GA doesn’t operate on a ticket like Part 135 or 121.  My passengers are known to me and are friends or family and don’t require a pat down to get on my airplane — ever. 

When LASP II comes out, we’ll read it and post our opinion here, I can tell you it won’t be good because it’s unnecessary in our opinion.  Security, like charity, starts at home, or in this case the hangar; not in DC.

Posted: October 12th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized

TSA vows to learn from breast cancer survivor’s pat-down

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By Keith Laing – 10/03/11 05:42 PM ET

 

The Transportation Security Administration said Monday that it while it strives “to treat every passenger with dignity and respect,” it did not in the case of a passenger with breast cancer who was patted down.

New York resident Lori Dorn has said her chest implants were patted down recently at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport. Dorn wrote a blog post about the incident in which she said that even after she told the TSA agents about her condition, her chest was examined.

“We regret that this passenger did not have a positive experience,” the agency said in a statement that was provided to The Hill Monday afternoon. “The Federal Security Director for JFK personally reached out to the passenger to apologize and learn about her experience to help ensure a smoother checkpoint experience for passengers in similar circumstances going forward.”

TSA did not, however, say that patting down Dorn was inappropriate. Instead, the agency said that Dorn’s medical condition “should have triggered a more compassionate response from our officers, such as an offer on our part of private screening.

“During the screening process, if advanced imaging technology detects an anomaly that cannot be cleared, secondary screening is required to ensure the passenger does not have threat items, such as explosives concealed under clothing,” the agency said. “In this instance, we should have allowed the passenger to present her medical card after she indicated that she had one. As a result of this occurrence, we will be looking at refreshing some training to use this as a learning opportunity.”

The agency said it was working with breast cancer advocacy groups to improve its handle of future situations like Dorn’s.

In her blog post last week, Dorn said she understood the need for security at airports, but she said her treatment was insensitive.

“I have been through emotional and physical hell this past year due to breast cancer,” she said on her blog post. “The way I was treated by these TSA agents added a s—tload of insult to injury and caused me a great deal of humiliation.”

 

So, the TSA vows to “learn”, again…  and again… and again.  One day they will be on your ramp, at your hangar, stripping your car (already been done at West Palm Beach under Operation Playbook), feeling up your children (already been done at commercial airports all over the country, feeling up your wife or Mom (again, already been done), feeling you up (again, already been done, that’s why you see the uniformed flight crew taking their shoes and belts off).

But they’re going to learn.  Like they said they would after requiring a returned Iraqi veteran to remove his prosthetic leg.  As he told them, “A little late man, the bomb already went off”.  But then I guess that’s to be expected, after all Janet lumped veterans and Republicans in there with terrorists…

How much longer?  Contact your Congressman and let them know.

 

Posted: October 5th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized

This appears to be more than just TSA…

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Aviation International News » October 2011

 
by Paul Lowe
 
October 1, 2011, 8:15 PM
The House Homeland Security Committee was expected to take action last month on the “Aviation Security Stakeholder Participation Act of 2011,” which will establish an industry committee within the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to advise the assistant secretary of Homeland Security on aviation security matters.
 
If approved by the full House, the Senate and the President, the bill (H.R. 1447) would create an Aviation Security Advisory Committee that would include several working groups, including a general aviation security working group that would make recommendations on security issues for general aviation facilities and general aviation aircraft and helicopter operations at GA and commercial service airports. The bill passed out of the House Homeland Security subcommittee on transportation security on September 14 by a 6-3 vote. 
 
Within a year of enactment, the bill would require the TSA to develop procedures and protocols to permit business aircraft operators access to airspace closed by temporary flight restrictions. Such airspace, usually surrounding a traveling dignitary and major sporting events, has for the decade since 9/11 been closed to virtually all civilian traffic. The subcommittee bill calls for reopening that airspace to general aviation under some circumstances, as long as doing so does not affect security.
 
The measure also contains an amendment from subcommittee chairman Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) aimed at bringing consistency to the TSA’s use of “security directives” (SDs). That issue was the subject of a letter sent to Rogers on September 13 by a coalition of aviation groups that includes NBAA, AOPA, the Air Transport Association, the Airports Council International, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and the National Air Transportation Association.
 
The membership of the advisory committee will consist of individuals representing not more than 27 member organizations, including air carriers, all cargo air transportation, indirect air carriers, labor organizations representing air carrier employees, aircraft manufacturers, airport operators, general aviation, privacy, the travel industry and the aviation technology security industry, including biometrics.
“We commend the House subcommittee leaders for passing this legislation, which gives business aviation a greater voice in the security policies that impact our industry,” said NBAA president and CEO Ed Bolen.
 
 
Well, they are going to open the DC-3, that can’t be all bad.  It appears this could have some teeth and actually curtail the TSA and their grab of your flying freedom.  What it’s impact will be on stuff already out there remains to be figured out:  LASP is now pushed to the first half of next year apparently.
 
So, email, fax, call your Congressman and support this bill.
 
 
 
 
Posted: October 4th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized